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Malvertising threat on the rise but ad-blocking tools could stem the ride

It is now routinely used by cyber criminals to inject malware into unwitting computer systems and cause havoc by exploiting flaws in popular software such as Adobe Flash, as Jérôme Segura, senior security researcher at Malwarebytes, explains.

The future of internet security

CEO of internet security software company Malwarebytes, Marcin Kleczynski, believes that one of the biggest upcoming security threats we are at risk from is malware being uploaded to users’ computers without them even having to click on anything, through online advertisements built into webpages.

Mobile Threat Monday: SMS Agent Spies on your Android Phone

The methods a rogue state might use to launch digital attacks on other countries are the same methods malware creators use to profit from victims. All this to say that the latest malicious app we’ve heard about from Malwarebytes has a method, targeted region, and even name straight out of a Cyber Cold War.

CoinVault, Bitcryptor ransomware declared dead following arrests

According to Adam Kujawa, head of malware intelligence at Malwarebytes Labs in San Jose, Calif., Kaspersky’s tool uses the encryption algorithm and block cipher to quickly decrypt user data, but warned that this isn’t a cure-all for ransomware in general.

Anti-adblocker firm PageFair’s users hit by fake Flash update

Chris Boyd, malware intelligence analyst at Malwarebytes, told The Register that these attacks most usually came via rogue adverts, and it was “hugely ironic to see Malware instead being served by a compromised analytics platform which is itself based around the notion of adblock measurements and ‘non intrusive ads’ for page visitors running ad blockers.”

White House applauds Senate cybersecurity vote

Adam Kujawa, head of malware intelligence at the research arm of anti-malware company Malwarebytes, told CBS News, “The bill passing is mainly a knee jerk reaction. Its overwhelming support in the Senate is likely due to the fact that they want a quick fix solution. But if privacy is compromised in the pursuit of security, then right at the start, the attempt has failed and it all comes down to security theatre.”

Qualcomm Unveils Muscle Camera for Surveillance Systems

“Now those cameras have a significant amount of computing power. That makes them very attractive targets,” said Jean-Philippe Taggart, a senior security researcher with Malwarebytes.

CISA Passes Senate: Should You Be Worried?

“CISA is not the worst thing ever, in the sense that it means well,” Adam Kujawa, head of malware intelligence at Malwarebytes Labs, told Tom’s Guide.

But “a bill like this should never just pass for the sake of passing,” he added. “If that happens, we are dealing with another PATRIOT Act, something which was rushed out the door because of outcry and has been used plenty of times for both the benefit and detriment of various parties.”

Mobile Threat Monday: Friends With No Benefits

Sex sells. Whether it’s the subtle and elegant eroticism of a luxury clothing brand or Ashton Kutcher talking to a busty slice of pizza, getting customers hot and bothered is a time-tested method of endearing them to your product. Titillating people can also get them to ignore otherwise shady and obnoxious behavior. The plethora of adware and malware on porn websites hasn’t caused a dip in their traffic. We’ve already covered how the deadly combination of porn and malware has migrated from PC to mobile, and this week’s mobile threat tip from Malwarebytes is just one more cold shower.

Daily Mail caught on hooks of Angler exploit kit

Net nasty numero uno, the Angler Exploit Kit, has infected advertising on the Daily Mail’s website, causing the site to serve up malware to its readers’ machines.

A security blog posted by internet security company Malwarebytes reported that a sophisticated malvertising attack had been found afflicting advertisements on DailyMail.com.

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